thisnewdevilry:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard is a treasure.

thisnewdevilry:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard is a treasure.

(via coldarrow)

rebootingfromstart:

barneswinter:

In all seriousness, I watched this interview on Monday and that’s actually what pushed me to finally get help for my depression and anxiety the very next day. I’ve got a long road ahead of me, I know that, with my bipolar disorder diagnosis being new….but if I ever meet him, I just have to tell him that this little interview of his probably saved my life. 

Everything he says in this interview rings so true to me. Well, obviously not the movie star parts, but the part about brain noise being the source of suffering, and the best parts of your life being the times when you can settle that brain noise down. That’s exactly how my anxiety feels to me, like there’s this extra track in my head that I can’t control, that I have trouble not listening to a lot of the time.

I think it’s incredibly brave of him to be as open about this as he is. We’re so used to seeing actors as perfect, or as not-perfect in “typical” ways, we don’t think of them as people who get anxiety. The more people who are willing to talk about it, the less the stigma will be, and the more people will realise that if someone like Chris has this illness but can deal with it and be a good person, so can they. And hell, he’s probably articulating things a lot of people aren’t able to articulate themselves. God knows I didn’t realise I had depression until I saw other people talking about the symptoms and realised “that’s exactly how I feel”.

(via coldarrow)

Anonymous asked:

I have a question. One of my high school professors had snakes, but he planned on putting any snake down if they got over six feet in length. He explained that they would be too dangerous/expensive to keep. Is that okay to do?

benthicbeauty:

earthandanimals:

scalestails:

NO that is by NO MEANS OK WOW

Holy SHIT is that not ok. I can’t even wrap my head around that it’s like??? Why would you get an animal if you aren’t going to take care of it? You can’T JUST KILL AN ANIMAL WHEN YOU DON’T WANT TO TAKE CARE OF IT ANYMORE HOLY SHIT

First and foremost a 6 foot corn snake is virtually HARMLESS even if they DO bite you (which is very unusual). He has to specify what kind of snake he would consider “dangerous”. And just because a snake reaches 6 feet does not mean it is any more aggressive than it was a 5 or 4 feet. And expensive??? What the fuck does he mean by that? A $7 rat once or twice a MONTH is too expensive or something?!???! I REALLY DON’T KNOW WHAT THE FUCK HE’S TALKING ABOUT.

Like. The only “dangerous” snake I can think of at 6 feet would be a particularly aggressive constrictor like an african rock or an extremely out of character burm or something. Or maybe a scrub python, but I highly doubt he’d get one of those at any point in time. And by “dangerous” I mean that at that length it would be wise to have two people handle them, for safety’s sake. Like, so the snake doesn’t decide to use your neck as support (NOT try to kill you literally assume your neck is a good branch to cling to) and accidentally suffocate you. That’s it.

That professor is fucked up. Just fucked up to ever consider something like that an option.

image

This is my 6 foot Corn he isn’t exactly harmless because he can bite and it will hurt.. but he certainly can not kill a human. 99% he is a chill noodle that wants nothing more than to just slither around.

Any animal can be dangerous.. I honestly don’t think your Professor should have ANY animal period.

I am torn between being angry at the idiot professor, and wanting to gush over your adorable little corn snake.

Local friends, y’all need some snakes I can come hug.

atheologos:

pilgrimstateofmind:

ATTENTION FOR A SECOND, YO: Real talk, this animal (the Ordovician Helmet crab, aka the Horseshoe crab, aka the Atlantic’s most at-risk shelled animal) is of a species that is close to 450 million years old. They are considered endangered, and often wash up on the shores of Long Island (this big lady crab was at TR park in Oyster Bay)Note: these animals are often used to extract their blue blood and cure diseases. They help the ocean out big time. And they are one of the longest-surviving species on the planet. They’re washing up and people don’t think to/are scared to save them because of their deceivingly harmless barbs. Take note, friends. Their barbs are NOT stingers. They cannot hurt you. Their pinchers aren’t pinchers, they’re just little legs that are actually really soft! The barb tail they have is actually what they use to stick into the ocean floor or the sand when waves knock them over or they flip onto their backs by accident. And you can help them out by flipping them back over very quickly and helping them scuttle back into the water if you see them struggling. This is way important. Just call me the Sarah McLachlan of horseshoe crabs.

WHERE DID SHE GET THAT KABUTO FOSSIL

atheologos:

pilgrimstateofmind:

ATTENTION FOR A SECOND, YO: 

Real talk, this animal (the Ordovician Helmet crab, aka the Horseshoe crab, aka the Atlantic’s most at-risk shelled animal) is of a species that is close to 450 million years old. They are considered endangered, and often wash up on the shores of Long Island (this big lady crab was at TR park in Oyster Bay)

Note: these animals are often used to extract their blue blood and cure diseases. They help the ocean out big time. And they are one of the longest-surviving species on the planet. They’re washing up and people don’t think to/are scared to save them because of their deceivingly harmless barbs. 

Take note, friends. Their barbs are NOT stingers. They cannot hurt you. Their pinchers aren’t pinchers, they’re just little legs that are actually really soft! The barb tail they have is actually what they use to stick into the ocean floor or the sand when waves knock them over or they flip onto their backs by accident. And you can help them out by flipping them back over very quickly and helping them scuttle back into the water if you see them struggling. 

This is way important. Just call me the Sarah McLachlan of horseshoe crabs.

WHERE DID SHE GET THAT KABUTO FOSSIL

(via petrak)

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

(via petrak)

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

(via coldarrow)